DESALVO, MICHAEL A.
Dec 11, 2016 | 2839 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A funeral mass was offered Dec. 7 at St. John Paul II Parish at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church, Bayonne, for Michael A. DeSalvo, 89, of Whiting, formerly of North Bergen. He passed away at his home surrounded by his family on Dec. 3. Born in New York, Michael resided in North Bergen for most of his life before moving to Whiting 11 years ago. Retired in 1992, Michael was employed with the Hearst Magazine Company in North Bergen for 25 years where he held the position of district sales manager. He also worked for Yonkers Raceway for 40 years as a supervisor of sales. Michael served his country in the United States Army during WWII. Michael was predeceased by his son Michael J. in 1970 and his parents Joseph and Letty (Badia) DeSalvo. Left to cherish his legacy are his wife of 66 years, Frances (DeBarr) DeSalvo; sons, James and his wife Donna DeSalvo; and Robert and his wife Esther DeSalvo; sisters, Carmella French, Ann Caricone, and Sylvia Chiellini; grandchildren, Robert A., Michael F., Christina M., and Lauren E. DeSalvo; and one great-granddaughter, Brianna. Services arranged by Dworzanski & Son Funeral Home, Bayonne.
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GODINO, RICHARD D.
Dec 11, 2016 | 28 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A funeral mass was held Dec. 7 at Our Lady of Mercy Church, Jersey City, for Richard D. Godino, 71. He died Dec. 2 at Bayonne Medical Center. A lifelong Jersey City resident, he was the son of the late Rose Borello Godino and Miles Godino. He was a dispatcher for the Jersey City Dept. of Public Works for 31 years. He retired in 1998. He was a U.S. veteran of Viet Nam. He was the husband of the late Maureen Grabowski Godino; father of Marcy Sears (Michael) and Laura Gallagher (Sean); grandfather of Sean Gallagher, Michael Sears and Rebecca Sears; brother of the late Dominick and Paul Godino. Services arranged by the Greenville Memorial Home, Jersey City.
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Marketing is my future
Students get a taste of how to design, finance, and sell a product
by Hannington Dia
Reporter Correspondent
Dec 11, 2016 | 221 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Weehawken High students had to determine the target market for their product, financing, the returns on each unit, the pitches, and the commercials, simulating the actual process that goes into bringing products from blueprint to shelves. The group that impressed the judges the most won $25 Amazon Prime gift cards.
Weehawken High students had to determine the target market for their product, financing, the returns on each unit, the pitches, and the commercials, simulating the actual process that goes into bringing products from blueprint to shelves. The group that impressed the judges the most won $25 Amazon Prime gift cards.
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Weehawken High School students recently got a chance to design and market their own headphones, courtesy of an event by SuitUp, a non-profit dedicated to boosting “career awareness” for young pupils by organizing partnerships with corporate brands and schools. Employees from UBS, a global marketing firm that partnered with SuitUp for the day, divided the students into four groups. Their challenge for the day? Design and market a new product for the popular Beats By Dre headphone brand. The groups had to determine the target market for their product, financing, and the returns on each unit. They also came up with pitches and commercials, simulating the actual process that goes into bringing products from blueprint to shelves. Whichever group impressed the judges the most won $25 Amazon Prime gift cards. But the real prize, according to SuitUp Event Coordinator Madeline Perez, was getting students to realize they can always aspire higher in life. “One of our founders was working for Teach For America in Brooklyn, and she would ask the kids, ‘What do you guys want to be when you grow up?’” Perez said shortly before the event started. “The kids would say such things as, ‘Beyonce!’ and ‘LeBron!’ And while that’s really awesome – I mean, who wouldn’t wanna be Beyonce or LeBron? Can you blame them? – that was all they were exposed to. They didn’t know the different avenues that they could take. What do you want to be when you grow up? That’s a big question in and of itself.” Marketing whizzes of the future That message seemed to resonate with the WHS students. For senior Jennifer Acosta, interested in a possible dual career in marketing and mechanical engineering, the event only helped her confidence. “One of the representatives from UBS, he was a mechanical engineer before he was a worker,” Acosta said during lunch break. “I like the idea of coming up with a new product and having to sell it and pitch the idea to a company.” Acosta’s group’s idea involved a sound system for the home that plays music; each room would have pre-recorded voices from celebrities such as Rihanna and Drake that talk back to you if you wanted to change a song, for instance. “It’s a good opportunity to find out more about my career, and learn more about working with different people-different ideas,” said Juan Arango, who plans on majoring in marketing in college. “This is all marketing-based, and I love it.” “I wanna find what best fits (in regards to marketing) for every population,” he said. “People in Latin America don’t like the same things as people in America. In Europe, they might like soccer more than we do.” Arango’s group focused on creating a more personalized Beats product that can adapt to any situation you may find yourself in. “I would like to be in business and finance in the future, and I thought this was a great opportunity to learn something about it,” said Neel Maripeddi, whose group idea was a Beats product that can turn into speakers with pads attaching to walls. “I take AP Economics and I’m also interested in doing something in business and finance in the future,” said Isabel Jaffoni. “I wanna do something math-related. I’ve been looking at actuaries-risk factors, insurance and stuff.” Jaffoni’s group, which ended up winning the competition, came up with the idea of a Beats product that can transform into a necklace via magnet and molds to the individual owner’s ear. For more information on how to bring SuitUp competitions to your school (they are only within the NYC area currently, but plan on expanding in the future), visit http://www.suitupnyc.com/suitupschools/
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Businesses coming and going
New Korean restaurants, gyms, and clothiers land in town
by Marilyn Baer
Reporter Staff Writer
Dec 11, 2016 | 185 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
NEW
All Things Bell, (left) and sisters Kiersten and Krista’s restaurant Shaka Bowl opened this fall.
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Hoboken is a busy mile square with new businesses landing here every month. The latest crop includes two Korean restaurants, a clothing wholesaler, and a new fitness studio. Several popular businesses are also leaving the city or moving to a different part of town (see sidebar). The historic Blimpie restaurant is heading uptown, employees say. The Reporter walked around town to find out which businesses are opening in the near future and which have opened recently. If you have one we missed, email us at editorial @hudsonreporter.com and put Hoboken in the subject head. Uptown Fit Foundry, at 1416 Willow Ave. atop Battaglia’s Home, is scheduled to open mid-December, according to founder David Quevedo. The new fitness studio will offer personal small group session of two to four people, an open gym membership, and larger team sessions. A few blocks to the southeast, All Things Bell, a women’s and children’s customized clothing wholesaler, has opened in a small storefront at 1204 Washington St. It’s owned by Alicia Bell, a clothing designer who came up with the customizable “build your own shirt” endorsed by Oprah, Kelly Ripa, and Madonna. “This grew out of needing office space,” said Bell. “So why not see about a store in Hoboken which would have a showroom and boutique in the front and offices in the back?” She said the shirts have become popular in Hoboken as there are a lot of working women in the area. Bell said the shirts come in different sizes and shapes and women can come in and look at swatches and customize the clothes to their liking. The shirts take two to three weeks to make in Chicago, Bell said. The boutique also carries accessories and children’s jewelry. West Side Three new businesses have opened in the Monroe Center at 720 Monroe St. The restaurant Shaka Bowl opened Oct. 15, and offers a nutritional taste of Hawaii, from smoothies and acai bowls to poké bowls.
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“We are like the show ‘Cheers.’ ” – Tina Daroowalla
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The family restaurant was opened by two sisters and a brother and was inspired by a time when sisters Kiersten and Krista studied in Hawaii, according to Kiersten. “We fell in love with the culture,” said Kiersten. “It was so warm and welcoming and the healthy clean eating was really tasty. And there was nothing really over here like it yet.” Kiersten, the head chef, wrote the menu two years ago and pitched to the idea to her brother. The trio, originally from Bergen County, have since moved to Hoboken and are hoping to expand the restaurant in the next few years. Meanwhile, Branding Shorts, which opened in August of this year, creates short videos for companies all over the country to train employees, promote products and businesses, and fundraise for nonprofit groups. Husband and wife team Tony Parente and Micki Pegano, Branding Shorts Founders, decided to relocate their business from New York to Hoboken after moving here to start a family. “We were looking to expand, and to start a family in New York was just crazy expensive,” said Pegano. “I was reluctant to cross the river but we kept coming back to Hoboken almost like a magnet… the sense of community is beautiful in this town and I don’t miss [New York] one bit.” Branding Shorts has worked with companies all over the country including Dunkin Donuts, Lawreys, and more locally with the Cake Boss, Cork, and the American Legion post. They have also done work for local and national charities. Also in the building, Tessa International School will have a soft launch with a full opening in the fall of 2017 and offers full language immersion classes in French and Spanish in language and math for preschool aged children. Founder and Executive Director Isabelle Bonneau decided to open the school in Hoboken as she believes there is large demand for language immersion education. According to Robert Mullins, the head of the school, they have already had a few families enroll their children for the coming year. Midtown O’Bagel opened in March at the corner of Sixth and Washington streets after the owners took a year to renovate what used to be S. Sullivans Bar & Grill. “Every issue you can imagine we came across,” said owner Stephen El Hassan. He said they had to put in all new plumbing and electrical wiring. He and his sister Helengrace opened the location “with a modern touch on a classic family business.” El Hassan said his father opened the first O’Bagels in Warren Township and Basking Ridge and he had “realistically started to create the menu at 8 years old” in his father’s place. The restaurant offers classic and new bagel sandwiches for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Karma comes back Karma Kafe, 505 Washington St., reopened its doors in November after being closed for nearly a year due to a fire next door. “We can’t thank the first responders enough,” said owner Tina Daroowalla. “I can tell you Hoboken is fantastic,” said Daroowalla. “People have walked in and hugged us and said they were happy to see us. Every night we hear they are happy to have us back and say ‘We missed you.’ ” “We are like the show ‘Cheers,’ ” she added. The restaurant serves Indian food and is famous for its lunch buffet. Downtown At 79 Hudson St. Gogi Grill opened its doors for the first time on Halloween. Inku Yo, owner of the new Korean fast food restaurant, said the idea had been brewing for at least 10 years. “It started when a co-worker and I wanted to partner up and make a big splash by opening 100 of them like a Korean Panda Express,” said Yo. “It began with the question, ‘Why isn’t it everywhere, like Chinese food?’ ” Yo said his favorite menu item is the scallion pancake taco, his own creation. Across the street, a Korean and American fusion restaurant, So Gong Dong Fresh, opened its doors in September at 70 Hudson Street. Marilyn Baer can be reached at marilynb@hudsonreporter.com. ------- SIDEBAR---- Blimpie moving; Sobsey’s and Ganache leaving Other businesses are moving or leaving town. The “World’s First Blimpie Sandwich Store” is likely to relocate next spring from First and Washington streets to an uptown location. A Blimpie employee who has worked at the location for years said on Tuesday that employees were informed of the move a few weeks ago and the store will move in May or June to a new location at 14th and Willow. Blimpie opened its doors at 110 Washington St. in 1964 and grew into the chain of sandwich restaurants now headquartered in Scottsdale, Ariz. According to a real estate listing by Ripco Real Estate, the store’s “prime retail location” is now on the market and will be available in 2017. The 14th and Willow area is a rapidly developing former industrial neighborhood in the northwest part of Hoboken. Several new apartment buildings have risen in the area, and a Trader Joe’s market is expected to open in February. Meanwhile, Sobsey’s Produce, a small grocery store at 92 Bloomfield St., will be closing its doors after 26 years, according to owner Michael Sobsey, who has decided to retire. “We don’t know yet when we will close. It will depend on when we find a tenant,” said Sobsey. “I have mixed feelings,” he said. “It has a long history… we’ve been here a long time… but at the same time I am looking forward to whatever comes next.” Sobsey said will miss his customers and people he worked with. He noted, “It’ll be difficult to get good produce when I’m not here anymore.” He added that the “business is as strong as ever” but that it is “the last of its kind, meaning an independent natural food seller.” Sobsey’s started at a time when there were no farmers’ markets in town. Now, the city has several that come in one day per week, but aren’t open all year. Also closing will be Ganache, the small coffee shop and eatery in The Hudson Tea building at 1500 Hudson St. General Manager Sanan said, “Ganache will be closing its doors at the end of next week [Dec. 18] as our lease is up at the end of December.” Sanan said Ganache was closing because the company that owns the space “doubled the price of the rent.” “I’ve been dedicated to this place for nine years,” he said. “It’s our baby. We started it from scratch. We are going to miss our customers.”
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IPPOLITO, ROBIN MARIE.
Dec 11, 2016 | 28 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A mass of Christian Burial was offered Dec. 9 at St. Joseph Church, Jersey City, for Robin Marie Ippolito, 51, a lifelong resident of Jersey City. She passed away at home surrounded by her family on Dec. 6. Robin was the daughter of Joseph and Patricia Ippolito; granddaughter of the late Tobia and Lucrezia Ippolito, William and Margaret Vreeland. Robin was also survived by many loving aunts, uncles and cousins. Services arranged by the Riotto Funeral Home and Cremation Company, Jersey City.
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