Wall Street Journal says growing families are leaving Hoboken, but is school district really 'least attractive'?
Aug 30, 2012 | 4408 views | 5 5 comments | 24 24 recommendations | email to a friend | print
HOBOKEN HIGH SCHOOL – HHS will get a new principal this fall.
HOBOKEN HIGH SCHOOL – HHS will get a new principal this fall.
slideshow
HOBOKEN -- A story posted on the Wall Street Journal blog on Tuesday says that census data shows that many families with toddlers move out of Hoboken when their children reach school age. The story finds several metropolitan areas where this is the case, and discusses them. Accompanying the article is a story putting Hoboken as the city at the top of a short list of "America's least attractive school districts."

The idea that young professionals leave Hoboken when their kids reach school age is nothing new; former Hoboken resident Evelyn Nieves wrote about it in her 1994 New York Times story entitled "Hoboken: Having it all, and then leaving it." So have things changed in 18 years?

Perhaps. Hoboken's population of families has grown. Local mom Kathy Zucker points out on her blog that the article failed to take into account other reasons why growing families might leave Hoboken, including the lack of affordable three-bedroom homes.

Zucker says she pointed the WSJ reporter toward various families, but they weren't quoted in the story.

What do you think? Comment below.
Comments
(5)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
VoteHoboken
|
September 06, 2012
Many reasons factor into a parents decision to move from Hoboken as their children get older not just the schools.

Pascack
|
September 04, 2012
Interesting points here. Also would love to see reactions on this: hobokensthirdchoice.blogspot.com. It was sent to me in an email and for some reason I haven't seen it discussed.
Pat1109
|
August 30, 2012
MM -- I agree with you -- parents care. I'm criticizing the board members. Charters are popping up because middle class parents are frustrated by the results of the regular system.
Pat1109
|
August 30, 2012
The article ignores a powerful psychological factor: Many people who grew up in suburbs feel that their kids should, too. If you want a lawn, a backyard pool, and parking at every destination, Hoboken can't meet your needs.

That said, test scores stink in Hoboken public schools. They stank when gentrification began in the '80s, and they still stink now.

Why? School board politics. Control of the board has shifted between various reform movements to various old guard factions. But one thing has remained consistent: No one bothers to try to improve education. They spend their terms demonizing their opponents. The board is just a forum for adults with personal grudges.

My advice to board members: Break out of this little world and your petty personal obsessions. Visit schools in Greenwich Village and Brooklyn that have great test scores and Hoboken-style demographics. Find out how they did it. Replicate it. If you feel the need to "win," let the success of the school district be your vindication.
mmlorenzoherve
|
August 30, 2012
"But one thing has remained consistent: No one bothers to try to improve education."

Perhaps no one on the Board of Ed bothers, but local parents who have founded the Hoboken charter schools have; they've put in a lot of time, effort and hard work to help improve education for Hoboken kids. Yet the Board of Ed continues to be against them. Hopefully a fourth charter, DaVinci School, will soon win state approval and help change lives for the better for local students.