BAYONNE BRIEFS
Jan 05, 2011 | 3390 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A REAL SURVIVOR – This kitten was struck by a vehicle on Christmas Eve, but was unable to get treatment for more than 24 hours and was eventually shipped off to a Newark shelter, where members of the Bayonne Feral Cat Foundation retrieved her. Fortunately, her injuries were not life threatening. Named Christmas, the group is caring for her at a foster home with the hopes of adoption.
A REAL SURVIVOR – This kitten was struck by a vehicle on Christmas Eve, but was unable to get treatment for more than 24 hours and was eventually shipped off to a Newark shelter, where members of the Bayonne Feral Cat Foundation retrieved her. Fortunately, her injuries were not life threatening. Named Christmas, the group is caring for her at a foster home with the hopes of adoption.
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First baby for Bayonne?

Bayonne’s first baby will likely be Bianca Victoria Zaskowski, who was born in Freehold Township at 12:05 a.m. on Jan. 1. Delivered to Bill and Kerry Zaskowski of Bayonne, Bianca Victoria was born at the Centra State Medical Center at 8 pounds, 7 ounces. If she is indeed the first baby of Bayonne, she will be entitled to a number of prizes as the winner of the Bayonne Community News’s First Baby Contest. This will be reported in the Jan. 12 edition.

Vehicle fire put out

Bayonne firefighters had to brave snow covered streets and cold to put out a vehicle fire on Dec. 28 near Linnet Street and Broadway. Fire Chief Greg Rogers said firefighters put out the blaze quickly, but the vehicle suffered extensive damage to the passenger compartment. Firefighters were dispatched at about 9:41 p.m.

High Tech students present science program at Princeton University

Twenty-three students from the Hudson County Schools of Technology, chaperoned by Drs. Nina Lavlinskaia and Arun Srivastava, presented their science MIME at Science Day at Princeton University, announced Dr. Joseph Giammarella, director of High Tech High School and the Academy of Architectural & Contemporary Themes (AACT), in December.

Students practiced the art of miming—not the traditional “stuck in a box” version, but the performance of a scientific concept through artistic and comical means—for weeks prior to presenting the fruits of their labors at Science Day, sponsored by the Young Science Achievers Program. Based on a theme of superconductivity, High Tech students served as coaches to attendees. A resistance of exactly zero through a conductor when placed under a temperature of -32 degrees Fahrenheit or less experiments in superconductivity came across through skits, jokes, and interviews to illustrate the concept for laymen.

“The levels of enthusiasm and passion for the presentations were incredible,” noted Dr. Lavlinskaia, a 15-year veteran of teaching and High Tech’s science liaison.

Students started the day by studying high tech equipment, including million-dollar microscopes and lasers before tackling their MIME presentations. The students included Jill Carrera, Abraam Dawoud, Elizabeth Hart, Saadiah Khan, Piotr Kulik, Michael Mozampur, Chandni Sharma, Amr Tawfik, and Gabriel Wadsworth of Bayonne; Harrison residents John Gonzalez and Sandra Talbot; Hoboken residents Kristina Miller and Page Rossano; Hemal Gosai and Bushra Qureshi of Jersey City; Kearny residents Adrian Almonte, Corey Burke, Priya Dave, Shivam Naik, and Kajal Shah; Darlene Malave and Casandra Shearstone of North Bergen; and Secaucus resident Dhriti Dedhia.

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