Safe and secure

Commissioners introduce ordinance upgrading hotel regulations

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In an effort to improve the safety of guests staying at the 11 hotels in the township, the Board of Commissioners introduced an ordinance at their Sept. 12 meeting requiring the hotels to upgrade their notification procedures to guests with room reservations, customers who are utilizing their services, and vendors.
If adopted after a final vote at the Sept. 26 meeting, the hotels would have to issue written notification of any service disruptions. That notice would have to describe the disruption, and the right to a full refund for any stays the disruption impacts.
In an effort to protect jobs and maintain a sense of familiarity, hotel owners selling their property world have to provide the new owners with a list of critical employees at least 10 days before ownership transfers over.
The new owners would have to notify the critical employees of the transfer. They would also have to fill job positions at the hotel by first hiring from the critical employee list. The new owners would not be allowed to terminate critical employees for at least 90 days after the ownership transfer. Owners must also directly employ the critical employees, disallowing any third party subcontracting.
Another new mandate for owners who want to obtain or keep hotel business licenses would require surveillance cameras that can record footage of more than 90 percent of exterior and interior areas such as parking and driveways, front desks, and lobbies.
That footage would have to be saved for at least 30 days prior to deletion.
“We feel that those areas are critical,” said Township Administrator Chris Pianese, who pushed heavily for the ordinance’s video section. “We had the [police] chief’s input.”
The ordinance began as a discussion on the best ways to protect guests at the township’s hotels after a mass shooting at the Mandalay Bay Hotel in Las Vegas last October killed 58 people. Pianese and other officials had a meeting after the incident and continued working from there on the new regulations.
Members from the New York Hotel Trades Council, which represents hotel workers in New York and Northern New Jersey, were on hand at the commissioners’ meeting. However, Bhav Tiberwal, the union’s deputy political director, was not able to comment on the ordinance, because it is still pending.
Town Attorney Tom Kobin, who also worked heavily on the ordinance, said that the council had some input.

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“We had the [police] chief’s input.” – Chris Pianese

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New park equipment, sports lighting for field

The commissioners passed a resolution that authorizes the town to purchase park and playground equipment for the 64th Street Field for $103,457. Another resolution passed authorized purchasing outdoor sports lighting for the field, which will cost $126,865.

New stop sign

Twenty-Sixth Street at Grand Avenue and Jane Street on Grand, facing southbound traffic, will receive a stop sign, after the commissioners adopted an ordinance at the meeting. The town has fielded complaints about the intersection before.

Hannington Dia can be reached at hd@hudsonreporter.com