Exploring the Pride Lands

LSC offers Lion Guard exhibit for kids

An exhibit at Liberty Science Center will allow kids to explore the world of Lion Guard.
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An exhibit at Liberty Science Center will allow kids to explore the world of Lion Guard.

Several floors above the lobby of Liberty Science Center, the battle to maintain balance in the Circle of Life is being waged in a traveling display that allows kids ages three to seven to play in some of the Pride Lands from the animated TV series, “Lion Guard.”

The series is based on Disney’s 1994 film “The Lion King.”

Located in a space slightly larger than a garage, the traveling exhibit is a playground where kids can meet some of the characters and pretend to join the show’s hero Kion and his friends and help protect the balance in the Circle of Life.

The exhibit takes guests on an adventure through the Pride Lands, the magnificent kingdom first introduced in “The Lion King.” Kids will be inspired to protect the Circle of Life, train in the Lion Guard’s secret lair, explore the power of teamwork by going on special missions, and learn about the African savanna and the animals that live there.

The exhibition also includes the “Little Lion Guard,” an area where younger kids can engage in activities of exploration, creativity, and skill building.

By presenting the exhibit, LSC hopes to spotlight important learning areas, such as self development, problem solving, creative thinking, arts and culture.

Rachel Friedman, publicity assistant for DKC Public Relations, which promotes the exhibit, said the display was provided to Liberty Science Center as part of a traveling exhibit.

“Parents can bring their kids here when they visit Liberty Science Center to explore,” she said.

While there is a charge to get into Liberty Science Center, Lion Guard is a free exhibit which allows children to explore, learn, and get some exercise.

“Giving families a chance to experience our stories beyond the screen is a vital part of what we do and an example of how we can work together in communities to make a lasting impact,” said Nancy Kanter, of Disney Channels Worldwide in a press release.

Adventures abound

The exhibit has five distinct areas which depict various parts of the fictional landscape.

The whole exhibit is a kind of elaborate maze, in which kids wander through partitioned areas where they are presented with a variety of challenges, from rock wall climbing to problem solving. Kids can climb up into secret lairs, or make their way through imaginary woods.

The play area introduces kids to the characters that are part of the TV series, such as Kion, the leader of the group and the fiercest in all of the Pride Lands; Bunga, a fearless honey badger and the Pride Lands’ bravest; Fuli, a confident cheetah and the fastest in the Pride Lands; Beshte, a friendly and good-spirited hippo and the strongest in the Pride Lands; and Ono, an intellectual egret who is keenest of sight.

Kids can embark on an adventure in the baobab tree where they can help recover stolen eggs,  or search for yummy grubs, and even try to reach the baobab fruit hanging high in the tree-top.

They can imagine themselves building a bridge across a flooded river to help save baby animals from a landslide, or go down the slide, swing on the rope, and practice physical fitness while training in the Lion Guard Lair.

One portion is an actual maze that requires some problem solving skills to navigate in order to bring back a baby zebra to its mother. There is also a portion that allows kids to see if their loudest roar will send hyenas fleeing back to their own habitat.

Small bridges cross imagery rivers in which some of the creatures of Pride Land reside, one of several lessons about the animals living in that imaginary land. There are challenges posted for kids in the Lion Guard’s secret lair, while other portions provide kids with hands on activities and interactive play through special missions.

The Lion Guard exhibit will be at Liberty Science Center until Sept. 8.

General admission tickets cost $23.75 for adults, $19.75 for children. For more information, visit LSC.org.

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