2020 Census ends early after Supreme Court sides with Trump

Last chance was October 15

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2020 Census ends early after Supreme Court sides with Trump
Residents could respond to the 2020 Census through their phone. Photo by Tada Images for Shutterstock.

The 2020 Census has ended early after President Trump ordered the count to end. While a court battle extended the census from Sept. 31 to Oct. 15, the new end date is still two weeks short of the Oct. 31 deadline.

On Oct. 13, The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Trump Administration’s request to shorten the deadline.

The U.S. Census Bureau advised the public that the deadline to be counted was Thursday, October 15, before 11:59 p.m.

“I urge any and all Bayonne residents who have not been counted yet in Census 2020 to do so NOW,” Mayor James Davis told residents on Oct. 13.

During September, when the deadline was still in question, Davis urged residents to “act as though the census deadline remains September 30.”

The city needs a high census response to receive vital federal funding, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Davis and the city have hosted a number of events, including a food truck countdown party, to get residents counted.

“Our community needs your help,” Davis said. “You need to be counted now, or the City of Bayonne could miss out on millions of dollars during the next ten years.”

Final 2020 Census numbers

As the 2020 Census ends, Bayonne’s count is roughly equal to 2010 Census numbers.

“In Census 2010, more than 60 percent of our residents sent in their census forms,” Davis said. “Let’s try to match and exceed that number this year.”

As of Oct. 15, 61.6 percent of Bayonne residents had responded. By comparison, New Jersey has a 69.3 percent response rate.

In Hudson County, Bayonne currently ranks fifth; Secaucus 69.8 percent; Hoboken 69.1 percent; Guttenberg 62 percent; West New York 61.7 percent; Bayonne 61.6 percent; Weehawken 60.9 percent; North Bergen 60.5 percent; Union City 57.6 percent; and Jersey City 56 percent.

Of Bayonne respondents, 51.6 percent responded online.

These are the self-response rates. Final response rates will include those surveyed by census takers who have been knocking on doors since August.

10 years of funding at stake

Federal funding from now until the next census will be determined using data from the 2020 Census.

“Bayonne receives its own Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) from the federal government,” Davis said. “That grant is based on our population size. We get more than $1 million per year from that grant.”

For Bayonne, the anticipated CDBG allocation for 2020 is approximately $1.4 million. The block grant funds street-paving, senior citizen meal programs, and housing rehabilitation, among other programs.

“If our official population count were to fall below 50,000, we would no longer get our own Community Development Block Grant,” Davis said.

Medicare Part B, Medicaid, the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), and highway planning and construction also use federal funds.

“Census information helps determine federal funding for Special Education and Title I, a program that funds basic skills education,” Davis said. “Census numbers are used to calculate the federal-state mixture of funding for Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program, and Transitional Aid to Needy Families.”

According to the Census Bureau’s timeline for the 2020 Census, the results will be reported to Congress and President Trump by Dec. 31.

For updates on this and other stories, check www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Daniel Israel can be reached at disrael@hudsonreporter.com.

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