Secaucus Briefs

Fred Ponti, a teacher in Secaucus and one-time principal of Secaucus Middle School and Huber Street elementary school, died at 67 due to complications from pancreatic cancer. Ponti worked in the school district for 37 years before retiring in 2011. He passed away at his home in Brick, NJ.
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Fred Ponti, a teacher in Secaucus and one-time principal of Secaucus Middle School and Huber Street elementary school, died at 67 due to complications from pancreatic cancer. Ponti worked in the school district for 37 years before retiring in 2011. He passed away at his home in Brick, NJ.

Comedy night to benefit autism programs and Special Olympics

The Secaucus Knights of Columbus will host a Comedy Night for Autism Programs and The NJ Special Olympics. The event will be February 23 at 6:30 p.m. in the Immaculate Conception Church Auditorium, 760 Post Place in Secaucus. The cost per ticket is $30 and includes a roast beef dinner, beverages and deserts. If you would like tickets contact Neal at 201-575-9984 or email him at mcgarritye@aol.com.

Hudson Regional Hospital introduces germ-fighting system

Hudson Regional Hospital has purchased Surfacide UV-C emitting tower systems that will be used to kill superbugs, or multi-drug resistant organisms, including C.diff, MRSA, VRE, CRE and Acinetobacter in all its operating suites, labor and delivery suites, and isolation rooms.

The Surfacide Helios system implements multiple emitters through three towers that disinfect all exposed surfaces of the healthcare environments in a single 20- to 30-minute cycle, offering an effective additional line of defense for the hospital’s maintenance staff.

“The Surfacide machine increases the efficacy of our accredited maintenance program in place to create a safe and clean environment for all our patients and visitors,” said Dr. Nizar Kifaieh, president and CEO of Hudson Regional Hospital. “By allowing us to ‘see’ and reach areas that need to be disinfected in less time, our staff can work more efficiently, and increase the number of patients our doctors can accommodate.”

The Surfacide Helios system can detect anyone entering the room and shut off the three emitters instantly, ensuring patient, visitor and employee safety.

Blood drive sponsored by the Secaucus Fire Department

A blood drive will be held at Washington Hook and Ladder firehouse at 272 County Road from 4 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 31.

While appointments are preferred, walk-ins are welcome. All donors will receive free health screenings for cholesterol, blood pressure, temperature, iron, pulse and blood type.

Donors should weigh at least 110 pounds, eat a meal before donation, bring ID, and drink plenty of water before and after donating.

To make an appointment or for more information call 201-251-3703.

Blood reserves challenged by patient demand

New Jersey Blood Services, a division of New York Blood Center (NYBC) is asking for help to maintain an adequate supply of all blood types, but especially O-negative, the “universal” blood which can be transfused into anyone in an emergency.  Hundreds of additional blood drives need to be scheduled to meet projected hospital demand.  Current inventory of several blood types is running below the desired target level.

“It’s simple:  hospital patient demand for blood often outpaces our best efforts to recruit donors and schedule blood drives,” said NYBC Executive Director of Donor Recruitment Andrea Cefarelli.  “There are always reasons but we have to overcome that for the sake of hospital patients who need us.”

“This is one of the toughest times of the year,” Cefarelli added.  “We’re asking for our dedicated supporters to roll up their sleeves to make sure we’re able to provide our hospital partners with whatever they need to take care of their patients.”

Blood products have a short shelf life, from five to 42 days, so constant replenishment is necessary.  Each and every day there are patients who depend on the transfusion of red blood cells, platelets and plasma to stay alive. But blood and blood products can’t be manufactured. They can only come from volunteer blood donors who take an hour to attend a blood drive or visit a donor center.

To donate blood or for information on how to organize a blood drive call toll free: 1-800-933-2566 or visit: www.nybloodcenter.org