Security director at Bayonne High School charged with Sandy fraud

Timothy Carey allegedly filed fraudulent applications to relief programs for his shore house

The NJ Attorney General's Office has been investigating alleged fraudulent Sandy relief claims since 2014.
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The NJ Attorney General's Office has been investigating alleged fraudulent Sandy relief claims since 2014.

The Director of Security at Bayonne High School has been charged with fraud in relation to relief funds for Superstorm Sandy, according to the New Jersey Office of the Attorney General (OAG).

Timothy Carey, 54, is a retired Bayonne Police Detective who is currently a resident of Lincroft.

The OAG told the Bayonne Community News that Carey was charged by complaint-summons, meaning he was not arrested, on Monday, March 2. According to the OAG, the summons charged Carey with third-degree theft by deception and fourth-degree unsworn falsification.

Alleged shore house fraud

It is alleged that Carey filed fraudulent applications following Superstorm Sandy for state grants. Carey allegedly filed the fraudulent applications under the Homeowner Resettlement Program and the Sandy Homeowner and Renter Assistance Program.

New Jersey received $2.3 billion in CDBG funds in 2012 for housing-related programs, including $215 million that was allocated for the Homeowner Resettlement Program to benefit victims of Superstorm Sandy.

New Jersey also used funds to develop the Sandy Homeowner and Renter Assistance Program  to assist individuals and families with expenses for housing and other related needs after the superstorm.

Both programs were designed to help homeowners on the Jersey Shore recover from the devastating aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. Instead, Carey allegedly received funds from the grant program to make repairs to his summer home.

Carey allegedly falsely claimed in his applications that a property he owns on David Drive in Manahawkin was his primary home when Sandy struck. Carey’s Manahawkin residence was apparently damaged by Superstorm Sandy.

It is alleged that, in fact, at the time of the storm, his primary residence was in Lincroft. According to the Office of the OAG, the property in Manahawkin was a summer or weekend home for Carey.

As a result of the alleged false applications, Carey received a $10,000 Homeowner Resettlement Program grant and an additional $9,953 in Sandy Homeowner and Renter Assistance Program funds.

The allegedly fraudulent applications filed by Carey totaled $19,953 in relief funds to which he was not entitled, according to the OAG.

The program reliefs funds were reserved for residents of the Jersey Shore whose primary residences were damaged or destroyed by Superstorm Sandy. The funds aimed to help those who live in towns like Manahawkin, not for summer shore houses.

The charges are merely accusations, and he is presumed innocent until proven guilty. The charges appear to be part of ongoing investigations into potential fraudulent claims made after Superstorm Sandy.

Since 2014, more than 130 people have been charged by the OAG for allegedly diverting nearly $9 million in relief funds.

The office is continuing its aggressive efforts to investigate fraud in Sandy relief programs, working jointly with state and local officials as part of a task force to root out fraud.

For updates on this and other stories, check www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Daniel Israel can be reached at disrael@hudsonreporter.com.