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Secaucus resident still searching for living kidney donor

Second Ward Town Councilman James Clancy has been trying to help Nancy Talty

The Taltys have been searching for a live donor for over a year

Secaucus resident Nancy Talty, currently suffering from stage 5 kidney failure, is still in search of a kidney. 

Second Ward Town Councilman James Clancy has been trying to help the family locate a donor, reiterating the need for the vital organ at each meeting of the town council. Nearly a year after the Hudson Reporter first highlighted her need for a donor, Talty has not had any luck yet and the clock is still ticking.

“That family is still looking for someone to possibly donate a kidney,” Clancy said at the Jan. 25 meeting. “Time is running out for the person that needs the kidney.” 

Potential donors can call any of the following numbers to contact the family including: (201) 407-8267, (201) 240-7562, or (201) 865-3477. Or donors can contact Clancy through his office at the Municipal Complex. He urged as many people to come forward as possible to help with the chances.

“It’s been at least a year that I’ve been making this announcement,” Clancy said. “Time is running out and unfortunately, and they could really use someone to come forward. Not just one person, but six or seven or ten, because it’s very selective when it comes down to the testing that’s involved for the donor.” 

In urgent need of a donor

Nancy’s husband Bernie previously told the Hudson Reporter that Nancy received a kidney transplant more than 50 years ago from her identical twin sister Mary Ann in February of 1969, but that kidney has since run its course, and she is in need of another transplant. 

Doctors have said that the ideal treatment for her is a living donor. Receiving a living donor kidney would mean a greater chance of the kidney working immediately, lasting twice as long as a deceased donor kidney, and offering an improved quality of life. 

Nancy and Bernie Talty

Due to kidney disease on both sides of her family, Nancy’s sons cannot donate, nor can Bernie because of underlying health conditions, he said. With 100,000 people on the waiting list for a deceased kidney, only 11,000 people getting a transplant each year from someone who has died and donated their organs. He said that a live kidney donor would also mean Nancy would avoid five to seven years of waiting for a deceased donor kidney. 

“I am praying and hoping that my sweetheart will find a living donor and avoid dialysis,” Bernie said. 

For updates on this and other stories, check www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Daniel Israel can be reached at disrael@hudsonreporter.com.

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