Making memories last

Hoboken's Right Angle celebrates 35 years of business

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Pablo Godoy began working at the frame shop in 1993 and became its owner in 2006.
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Right Angle celebrated 35 years of business in September.
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Pablo Godoy began working at the frame shop in 1993 and became its owner in 2006.
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Pablo Godoy began working at the frame shop in 1993 and became its owner in 2006.
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Right Angle celebrated 35 years of business in September.
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Pablo Godoy began working at the frame shop in 1993 and became its owner in 2006.

Right Angle, a frame shop with two locations in Hoboken, has had some odd requests in its last 35 years of business.

From framing million-dollar works of art for Director Steven Spielberg to mounting cocktail napkins from a first date, Right Angle has done it all.

Opened since 1983 now with two locations, one uptown at 1108 Washington St. and the other downtown at 320 Washington St., the framing shop has grown and witnessed Hoboken evolve.

Pablo Godoy, who purchased the company in 2006 from original owner Toni Schroeder, began as an employee in 1993 after Schroeder decided to take a chance on him, a recent immigrant from Argentina with no framing experience.

Godoy began training just two hours a day after he worked a shift and started working on his English. With time, he became more confident in his craftsmanship and communicating with customers and grew to now own the business.

Changing with the times

Most of the company’s business is framing art. They offer museum-quality glass, frames from Europe and America made of high-quality wood, and services like archival framing and restoration services.

Depending on what a customer might want, prices range from about $69 on the low end to the most expensive being about $12,000 for ornate frames with gold leaf.

Godoy said the business has faced more competition from online outfits, but they have evolved with the times.

Art and memories

One of Right Angle’s missions has been supporting the local art community by showcasing their work in their locations.

On the walls of the uptown shop, one can see a variety of work by local artists including Hoboken scenes by local photographer Joe Epstein.

“I have been approached by some big names and very well-known artists, but I would rather support the local guy,” said Godoy. “You’ve got to stick to your guns. There are so many talented artists in town and I know how expensive it is to rent a space in Hoboken. Why wouldn’t we help?”

Godoy said his work is not just about framing works of art, but preserving memories.

Recently a resident came into the shop and explained to Godoy that he and his wife had been cleaning out their home when they came across a plastic bag. Inside was his wife’s wedding bouquet and his boutonniere.

“We looked at it and we wrapped a piece of her wedding dress around the bouquet and the [boutonniere], and we included their wedding invitation and now its become his anniversary gift to her,” said Godoy. “They are going to celebrate their anniversary at a nearby restaurant and we are going to light the gift in the window, so when he brings her by, she will see it.”

Godoy said this isn’t the first time he has framed unique items of sentimental value. Recently, the shop framed a handkerchief that belonged to a client’s grandmother who has since passed. He has also framed cocktail napkins from first dates of couples still together.

“If something is important, whether it’s a valuable piece of art or something you really care for which has sentimental value, we understand and we will help you protect it,” said Godoy.

Changing times

He has had challenges to meet over the years. When his business opened in Hoboken in the 1980s, the rent was only $1,100 a month. He would not comment on his current rent.

He said some companies will no longer deliver because of parking issues and the temporary construction along Washington Street. But among those changes and competition from chain stores, his shop has provided a service people need.

“We provide them good customer service,” he said. “We work with [customers] to understand what they want and design it for them.”

For more information on Right Angle, go to www.rightangle.com.

Marilyn Baer can be reached at Marilynb@hudsonreporter.com or comment online at hudsonreporter.com