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First Jersey City Bayfront building approved by Planning Board

The six-story, 210-unit building is the first part of the city’s ambitious Bayfront project

The first building in the city's Bayfront project will be constructed along the Hackensack Riverfront. Photo provided by the City of Jersey City.

The first building in Jersey City’s ambitious Bayfront redevelopment project was unanimously approved by the city’s Planning Board on Oct. 11, bringing a total of 210 units within a six-story mixed-use building.

The building, which had a redevelopment agreement for it approved back in July, will obtain the address of 445 Route 440 and Kellogg St., and will be developed by Bayfront Development Partners, a joint venture between Pennrose and Omni America, at the beginning of 2023, according to the city.

The Bayfront project is the city’s plan to turn a formerly contaminated 100-acre site once owned by the Honeywell Corporation into a mixed-use redevelopment alongside the Hackensack Riverfront.

The building will have 35 percent affordable housing, which will result in 74 affordable units, 12,410 square feet of retail space, 52 parking spaces and 143 bicycle parking spaces.

Civil engineer Joe Mele explained that the building will have the parking garage in the center of the building. The ground floor will have 5,310 square feet of commercial space, along with residential units on all levels.

There will also be two public parking spaces alongside the new Armstrong Ave. north of the building that will be designated for drop-off and pick-up for the day care center.

Architect William Stein then explained that the building will have 35 studios, 109 one-bedrooms, 43 two-bedrooms and 23 three-bedrooms, and that the affordable units will have the same designs as the market-rate units.

The ground floor will have two residential lobbies in the northwest and southeast corners, and the retail spaces will be on Kellogg St. on the south side of the building, which are anticipated to be a credit union and a technical training center.

The second floor of the building will have the daycare center, a landscape amenity terrace and other amenities such as fitness and yoga rooms, a children’s playroom, a co-working space and a community lounge. Floors three to six will then consist mainly of residential units.

The building will include commercial space, a day care center, amenities and a terrace space. Image by Dattner Architects via Jersey City Planning Board application.

The terrace space on the second floor will have walking paths, seating, cooking and grill areas, a fire pit, and other passive recreational elements. Apartments at that level will also have private terraces.

Bayfront Development Partners’ attorney Thomas Leane had Stein confirm that the building will have 32 moderate-income units and 42 low-income units, while the remainder are market rate. They also went more in-depth that 13 studios, 31 one-bedrooms, 15 two-bedrooms and 15 three-bedrooms will be affordable.

Leane also said a parking lot to the east of the building will be undeveloped “for the foreseeable future that is contemplated in the redevelopment agreement,” and that will be a service parking lot maintained by the redevelopment agency.

The commissioners voted 8-0 to approve both the subdivision and final site plans, and a few praised the project for the amount of affordable housing it will provide.

“This is the first time we are having so [much] affordable housing,“ said Commissioner Dr. Vijaya Desai “That’s what we need on all the applications.”

The day after the plans were approved, Mayor Steven Fulop said in a press release that they are “making strides to bring this groundbreaking vision to reality.”

“[…]maximizing the opportunity to build a premier residential and retail waterfront area that best serves the residents of Jersey City by prioritizing affordability, jobs for residents, quality public spaces, and attracting interest and investment to the south and west areas of Jersey City,” he said.

For updates on this and other stories, check hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Mark Koosau can be reached at mkoosau@hudsonreporter.com or his Twitter @snivyTsutarja.

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