Frontline workers receive second dose of COVID-19 vaccine

The county-run site was scheduled to administer nearly 1,000 vaccinations on Jan. 20

Second doses mean some folks are good to go.
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Second doses mean some folks are good to go.

On Jan. 20, the Hudson County Vaccine Distribution Center began administering its second round of the COVID-19 vaccines.

According to the county executive, roughly 40 frontline healthcare workers in Phase 1A were among those to receive their second doses at the USS Juneau Center with hundreds more scheduled for later this week.

The county-run site was scheduled to administer nearly 1,000 vaccinations on Jan. 20 alone.

“As we begin administering second doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, we are once again reaching new milestones in our fight against this virus,” said Hudson County Executive Tom DeGise. “The men and women who have been inoculated at our county-run vaccination center are among some of our finest frontline heroes who have been working to keep us safe and healthy since day one. We are continuing to make progress in the right direction, and Hudson County will continue its robust vaccination efforts until every eligible resident is vaccinated.”

By end of day, the Hudson County Vaccine Task Force, overseen by DeGise and operated by the Hudson Regional Health Commission, will have vaccinated approximately 4,500 individuals.

The center received an additional shipment of 2,000 vaccines as well as the necessary number of second doses on January 19.

‘Meeting our goal’

By Jan. 22, the site had a record high of 1,200 appointments, and the county projected that it will have used  96 percent of doses allocated to it by the state.

Points of distribution in Hudson County that are operated either by the county or by municipal health departments were projected to use at least 83 percent of their allocated doses by the end of Jan. 22.

“I’m incredibly proud of the work that our Hudson County Vaccine Task Force is doing along with the Hudson Regional Health Commission to keep our residents safe by administering this lifesaving vaccine,” said  DeGise. “Along with our partners on the municipal level, the available data clearly shows that we are meeting our goal of utilizing as much of the vaccine doses that we are allocated by the state as quickly and efficiently as possible. We are hopeful that we will be able to continue expanding our operations if more vaccine supply is made available to us.”

The data being tracked by the county includes municipal points of distribution operated by local health departments.

The data does not include doses that are administered by hospitals and medical offices, by Walgreens and CVS as part of the national partnership to inoculate residents at long-term care centers, by the state at its six mega-sites, or by any other entity.

Hudson County was the first in New Jersey to open a county-run public vaccination center. It’s a collaborative effort with the Hudson Regional Health Commission, the Hudson County Improvement Authority, the Hudson County Office of Emergency Management, County Department of Roads and Public Property, the Hudson County Schools of Technology, and the Hudson County Sheriff’s Office.

The center, at 110 Hackensack Ave. in Kearny, is open by appointment only.

Those currently eligible include doctors and nurses within private practices, dentists, hygienists, community and public health workers, funeral directors, paid and unpaid Emergency Medical Technicians, uniformed police and firefighters, those working in labs with infectious material, individuals over the age of 65, and those with underlying health conditions.

For more information or to register and schedule an appointment, visit hudsoncovidvax.org

For updates on this and other stories check www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Marilyn Baer can be reached at Marilynb@hudsonreporter.com.