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North Bergen adopts ordinance supporting renovations at 46th Street Field

North Bergen is moving forward with improvements to 46th Street Field amid opposition from some residents.

Mayor Nicholas Sacco and the North Bergen Board of Commissioners adopted an ordinance at the July 13 meeting to appropriate grant funds for improvements to 46th Street Field.

The ordinance authorizes the use of $500,000 from the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund for the 46th Street Field Improvement Project. The township previously applied for the grant funding back in December of 2021.

The project also has the support of the state of New Jersey. Sacco previously said that there was approximately $5 million in the state budget for the field improvements.

Improvements slated for park and field

The park is currently home to a playground, a basketball court, a baseball field, and a pedestrian walkway surrounding the baseball field as well as other amenities.

For the park area, the township is looking to: put in new playground equipment; resurface the basketball courts and outfit them with new backboards and rims; install new sheltered park benches; create an expanded splash park; repave the pedestrian walkway; repave the parking lot and add new spaces; install a trench system for draining; renovate the restrooms and storage building; relocate the dog run; create a new regular seating area; install new fencing; repair the existing staircase; and install new in-ground trash receptacles throughout the park.

For the ball field area, North Bergen is seeking to: install synthetic turf for both baseball and softball that includes a synthetic shock absorption for safety; put in a drainage system; replace the light fixtures and fencing; install a press box, covered bleachers, an on-field ball pens and new dugouts.

However, despite the planned upgrades, some residents took issue with the new parking lot that is part of the plan. A number of locals said the open space that would be paved over to make the parking lot was important to them.

Some residents oppose, some in favor

Normally meetings are devoid of any public comment, sometimes with attendance only consisting of the board and members of the media. But when the ordinance was introduced on June 22, the chambers were packed with residents, although few actually spoke.

According to the residents that did vocalize concerns about the project, the green area currently defined by a path and shade trees is a valuable space to those who use the park. They argued there was already a parking lot there for the baseball field, and that the lot should be more strictly enforced against residents in the neighborhood who park there regularly instead of paving over green space. In addition, the residents opposed to the improvements were worried that creating more parking would only bring more cars and worsen the parking problem.

Meanwhile, other residents favored the park upgrades. They said the additional parking was needed, the trees that would be removed would be replaced, and that further nitpicking the project could delay the already long-overdue and much-needed renovations.

Amid the debate and showing of residents at the meetings when it was both introduced and up for public hearing, the township stuck with its plans and adopted the ordinance with the parking lot as intended. To qualm concerns, the board held a special meeting to hear public comment and go over the planned improvements following the July 13 meeting.

Follow-up meeting and presentation

At the July 20 meeting, the Director of the Department of Parks and Public Property made a brief presentation followed by a question-and-answer period. All residents were encouraged to attend and participate to be heard regarding the park improvements.

The next meeting of the North Bergen Board of Commissioners is on August  at 6 p.m. in the municipal chambers in Town Hall at 4233 Kennedy Boulevard. For more information, go to northbergen.org.

For updates on this and other stories, check www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Daniel Israel can be reached at disrael@hudsonreporter.com.

Event series to promote mental health awareness continues at 16th Street Park

The Bayonne Interfaith Association, in conjunction with the City of Bayonne,  is set to host another event in its mental health awareness series at 16th Street Park.

The inaugural series kicked off last summer as residents sought some normalcy amid the relief in COVID-19 restrictions. Following the warm reception in 2021, the event series was continued again in 2022.

An organizer of the event, Rev. Dorothy Patterson of Wallace Temple AME Zion Church, highlighted that there has never been a more important time for mental health awareness.

Successful first and second events

This year, the city hosted the first of its series of mental health awareness events at 16th Street Park starting in late June. The event was dubbed the “Selfcare and Wellness Resource Fair” and was well attended on June 30.

The first event focused on sharing knowledge, providing resources, and promoting awareness of mental health. A number of organizations in Bayonne and many that operate countywide were in attendance, and free ice cream was provided.

That was followed by a movie night at 16th Street Park on July 28. Keeping with the theme of mental health awareness, the movie shown was “Encanto” and free ice cream was again available.

Mental health resources present at the first event were also available at the second event, and will also be present for the upcoming third event. The series of events continues in August.

Upcoming in August

Entitled “Shine A Light On Mental Health,” the event aims to continue to promote mental health awareness. Resources and information will be available to residents on August 11 at 6:30 p.m.

This event will feature skits, spoken word, songs, and self care throughout the evening, as well as more free ice cream. More events may be announced in the future.

For updates on this and other stories, check www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Daniel Israel can be reached at disrael@hudsonreporter.com.

BAYONNE BRIEFS

National Night Out makes a comeback

National Night Out returned in 2022 after a two year hiatus due to COVID-19. The event nationwide event, organized locally by the Bayonne Police Department, featured food and family fun on the lower level of 16th Street Park.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/19/bayonne-to-celebrate-national-night-out-at-16th-street-park.

Co-Ed Recreation Soccer registration is open

The League is open to children in grades 3rd to 8th Grade. All participants must be Bayonne residents. The fee for the league is $50 per player. This includes a game jersey. The fees collected will go towards the costs of running the program. The fee is non-refundable.

All individuals who sign up will be placed on a team by the Division of Recreation. The League will be broken down into divisions based on grade. Division I is for Grades 3 to 5, and Division II is for Grades 6 to 8. Divisions may change, depending on the final number of participants registered in each division.

Games will be played on Saturday evenings, tentatively at 5 p.m., 6 p.m., 7 p.m., and 8 p.m. The league will be games only. The deadline for all applications and payment is Friday, August 26. Register online at register.capturepoint.com/CityofBayonne.

The season is tentatively set to begin on Saturday, September 17. For further information, call Pete Amadeo at 201-858-6129 or email bayonnerec@aol.com.

The Bridge Art Gallery closes

The Bridge Art Gallery shut its doors in Bayonne after a farewell party on July 30.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/06/bayonnes-bridge-art-gallery-to-close.

City council moves to ban ownership of poultry and pigeons

Bayonne is looking to address the ownership of certain farm animals in the city, specifically when it comes to pigeons and poultry. The council introduced an ordinance authorizing the changes at its July meeting. A public hearing is set for August 17 at 7 p.m. in the council chambers at City Hall at 630 Avenue C.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/08/02/bayonne-moves-to-ban-ownership-of-poultry-and-pigeons.

Establishing procedure for extra-duty police services?

Bayonne is weighing a measure that would establish a procedure for extra-duty police services. The city council has introduced an ordinance to authorize amendments to existing city ordinances regarding the police department and extra-duty services at its July meeting. A public hearing is set for August 17 at 7 p.m. in the council chambers at City Hall at 630 Avenue C.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/08/02/bayonne-considers-establishing-procedure-for-extra-duty-police-services.

Officials kick off the 2022 Bayonne Coptic Festival. Photo courtesy of Councilman Juan Perez.

Bayonne Coptic Festival returns

The seventh annual Bayonne Coptic Festival was held from July 29 to July 31. The festival will offer food, fun, games, sports and more, sponsored by the St. Abanoub and St. Antonious Coptic Orthodox Church.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/20/bayonne-coptic-festival-to-celebrate-seventh-year.

City council considers increase fines to curb pet waste

Bayonne is considering a measure to target a deluge of unattended pet waste across the city. The city council has introduced an ordinance amending the general ordinances of the city relating to animal control, specifically the section regarding the removal of pet waste and the accompanying fines and penalties. A public hearing is set for August 17 at 7 p.m. in the council chambers at City Hall at 630 Avenue C.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/26/bayonne-council-to-increase-fines-to-curb-pet-waste.

Bayonne aims to tackle litter and overgrown weeds

Public Works Director Tom Cotter announced that an enforcement wave of Bayonne’s cleaning and weeding requirements “will begin shortly.”

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/18/bayonne-aims-to-tackle-litter-and-overgrown-weeds.

Summer Sounds By the Bay to end with Amish Outlaws

AM Gold Yacht Rock play Summer Sounds at the amphitheater at 16th Street Park on August 3. The New York City-based tribute band performs adult-contemporary hit songs from the late ’70s through the mid ’80s referred to as “Yacht Rock” including: Hall & Oates, Steely Dan, Huey Lewis, Christopher Cross, Lionel Richie and more.

The penultimate performance of Summer Sounds by the Bay 2022 includes Lights Out Beach Boys on August 10. The band has been described as a cross of listening to the Beach Boys while watching the smooth moves of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, and will perform all of the west coast hits.

Rounding out the concert series on August 17 is Amish Outlaws. The Amish Outlaws will constantly surprise the audience and keep everyone guessing as to what they could possibly play next, from Johnny Cash to Jay Z, Lady Gaga to Luke Bryan, and even to theme songs from the TV shows they have come to know.

Read the full lineup at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/05/25/summer-sounds-by-the-bay-lineup-announced-for-2022.

Upcoming movies at the library

The Bayonne Free Public Library will present two films on Wednesday, August 17, as part of its ongoing summer movie series. Both films will be shown in the O’Connor Gallery on the library’s second floor at 31st Street and Avenue C.

At 1 p.m., the library will screen ‘Firestarter,’ a science fiction thriller featuring characters with supernatural powers. The film stars Zac Efron, Ryan Kiera Armstrong, Sydney Lemmon, Kurtwood Smith, John Beasley, Michael Greyeyes, and Gloria Reuben. The film has a running time of 1 hour and 34 minutes and is rated R.

At 6:30 p.m. on August 17, the library will show Dr. Strange in the
Multiverse of Madness. This is a superhero film based on the Marvel Comics that feature Dr. Strange. The film stars Benedict Cumberbatch in the title role. Other stars include Elizabeth Olsen, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Benedict Wong, Xochitl Gomez, Michael Stuhlbarg, and Rachel McAdams.

Read the full lineup at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/06/23/bayonne-announces-summer-movies-at-the-library.

Library programming highlights from July

During the month of July, the Bayonne Public Library offered many programs and events. For adults, the library offered four “Tech Thursdays With Bill” classes covering Amazon, iPhones, Zoom, and Streaming Movies and TV. The library also presented seven English as a Second Language (ESL) classes on Monday and Thursday nights. The library hosted a virtual live author panel featuring three thriller authors.

For children, the library held two art classes, where students learned about charcoal and pastel drawing, drawing from life, collagraph printmaking, and monoprinting. There was a gnome hunt in the Children’s Room, a Stuff-A-Sea-Creature stuffed animal grab-and-go craft, and a jelly bean guessing contest. The library also had two visits from the WTCARES Day Camp.

For the whole family, the library debuted a new book recommendation service called “Your Next Great Read.” For that service, patrons can fill out a form online to receive customized book recommendation lists in return. During July, the library presented four Wednesday matinees and four Wednesday Family Night movies. There were ten open play nights for collaborative card and board gaming. The library’s most popular book titles in July for adults were: “Escape” by James Patterson and “Window on the Bay” by Debbie Macomber. The most popular children’s titles were: “Mr. Harrison is Embarrassin’” by Dan Gutman and “Olivia the Princess” by Natalie Shaw.

Ashes of spiritual leader spread in Hudson River

Hundreds of devotees of Shree Swaminarayan Siddhant Sajivan Mandal USA gathered at Liberty State Park to honor and remember 5th Spiritual Heir to Lord Shree Swaminarayan, Acharya Shree Purushottampriyadasji Swamishree Maharaj (Acharya Swamishree Maharaj), on August 6.

Acharya Swamishree Maharaj’s ashes were spread in the Hudson River near the Statue of Liberty, with a backdrop of the New York City Skyline and New Jersey Golden Coast. His predecessor, 6th Heir to Lord Shree Swaminarayan, Acharya Shree Jitendriyapriyadasji Swamiji Maharaj (Acharya Swamiji Maharaj), spread the ashes.

Acharya Swamishree Maharaj passed away on July 16, 2020. He served as Acharya of Maninagar Shree Swaminarayan Gadi Sansthan, a worldwide spiritual cultural organization, for 41 years.

‘Divine spreading of holy ashes’

Since July 2020, Acharya Swamishree Maharaj’s ashes have been spread all throughout the world, including in India, Australia, the United Kingdom, and Niagara Falls Canada. The Hudson River between New York and New Jersey is the final Asthi Suman Visarjan, or divine spreading of holy ashes, location for Acharya Swamishree Maharaj.

Shree Muktajeevan Swamibapa Pipe Band USA, North America’s only Indian American bagpipe band, commenced the event at Liberty State Park’s Flag Plaza. A procession was held from Flag Plaza to the Liberation Monument, where a ceremonial wreath was laid.

The ceremony began at Flag Plaza.

After Flag Plaza, the procession continued to the waterfront. There religious ceremonies were held to honor the ashes of Acharya Swamishree Maharaj.

Representatives for Governor Phil Murphy, Rep. Bill Pascrell of the 9th Congressional District, and Liberty State Park leadership were in attendance. A yacht was chartered on the Hudson River to allow Acharya Swamiji Maharaj to immerse the ashes of Acharya Swamishree Maharaj.

The bagpipe band played many memorial songs as the yacht cruised along the Hudson River. The ashes were immersed in the Hudson River and a white dove was released to signify peace and love.

Shree Muktajeevan Swamibapa Pipe Band USA led the procession to the Liberation Monument.

This was the last stop of the first North American visit by Acharya Swamiji Maharaj as the new leader of the faith.

6th heir visits North America

Maninagar Shree Swaminarayan Gadi Sansthan–North America welcomed Acharya Swamiji Maharaj to the U.S. in June for his inaugural visit to the country and Canada since becoming the world leader. He was accompanied by a team of sixteen eminent monks known as Sants, as they embarked on a seven-week religious tour of North America visiting all the chapters of Shree Swaminarayan Siddhant Sajivan Mandal USA, a non-profit religious organization located all throughout North America.

At the Liberation Monument, a ceremonial wreath was placed.

Shree Swaminarayan Siddhant Sajivan Mandal-New Jersey is a registered non-profit organization established in 1970, which is a branch of the worldwide organization Maninagar Shree Swaminarayan Gadi Sansthan. The Temple in Secaucus serves as the North American Headquarters for the organization and was built in 1998 and opened in 2001. Over 200 cultural Temples exist in the U.S., Canada, and across the globe.

Shree Muktajeevan Swamibapa Pipe Band USA welcomed Acharya Swamiji Maharaj at Newark Liberty International Airport, Terminal B, on June 21. In partnership with The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, a grand Welcome Swagat Sabha was held at the Newark Airport Welcome Center.

The procession then headed to the waterfront to continue the ceremony.

Dignitaries and devotees from across North America travelled to Newark Airport to welcome Acharya Swamiji Maharaj. Several Police Officers and members of Newark Airport leadership welcomed Acharya Swamiji Maharaj with fresh flower garlands.

Prior to becoming world leader, from 2004 to 2019, Acharya Swamiji Maharaj spent every summer in North America and has travelled to nearly all fifty states, spreading the Swaminarayan faith and core values of religious devotion, knowledge, peace, unity, and service to mankind. He follows in his predecessors’, Jeevanpran Shree Muktajeevan Swamibapa and Acharya Swamishree Maharaj, footsteps of expanding the Swaminarayan faith outside of India.

Several religious ceremonies took place at the waterfront.

Since his appointment in 2020, Acharya Swamiji Maharaj, of Maninagar, Gujarat, India, has travelled on religious mission trips to Australia, Kenya, the United Kingdom, and throughout India. His aim is to safely bring people back together, as restrictions begin to ease for COVID-19, and remind them of the importance of faith and unity.

Formal welcome in Secaucus

A formal welcome ceremony was held on June 22 at Shree Swaminarayan Temple in Secaucus. Despite forecast for rain all day, a break in the weather allowed for the outdoor welcome parade to proceed. Hundreds of devotees from across North America arrived at Secaucus Temple to welcome Acharya Swamiji Maharaj, as he sat on a hand-made, intricate chariot; custom made in USA by Mandir volunteers, as devotees sang and danced to welcome him.

A yacht was chartered to spread the ashes of the late faith leader in the Hudson.

Mayor Michael Gonnelli greeted Acharya Swamiji Maharaj to formally welcomed him to Secaucus, and the Indian-American youth of Secaucus Temple surprised everyone with a welcome dance as Acharya Swamiji Maharaj entered the Mandir. Several young devotees under the age of 10, who are a part of Secaucus Temple’s Gujarati Classes, sang kirtans in Gujarati to welcome Acharya Swamiji Maharaj, who continually promotes the importance of American born youth to learn their mother language of Gujarati.

Acharya Swamiji Maharaj then departed New Jersey to commence his tour. He opened a newly constructed, traditional Shikhar Bandh Hindu Temple in Ocala, Florida on July 7 to 9, followed by a groundbreaking ceremony for a new temple in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. He also visited chapters in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, California, Arizona, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Connecticut, and Canada.

The ashes were ceremoniously spread in the river near the Statue of Liberty.

Acharya Swamiji Maharaj concluded his inaugural North America tour in August back in New Jersey. Disciples from across the United States and Canada gathered on August 6 for the devotional remembrance ceremony and scattering of ashes honoring Acharya Swamishree Maharaj. Acharya Swamiji Maharaj celebrated the Secaucus Temple’s 21st Anniversary before eventually departing the U.S. to the U.K. on August 10.

For updates on this and other stories, check www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Daniel Israel can be reached at disrael@hudsonreporter.com.

Summer’s in full swing in Union City

Summer is here and Union City Mayor Brian Stack and the Board of Commissioners continue to schedule events for residents to enjoy.

“I invite you to go out and participate in all the programs, classes, and activities that we have planned for you,” Stack said in a letter to the community regarding recreation offerings. “Join other residents and make new friends while you attend our outdoor concerts and art exhibits, or while participating in the many fitness and wellness activities offered throughout the city. We are always planning new activities and trips for you to enjoy.”

Recreation opportunities this summer include plenty of fun for adults and youth alike.

“It has been an ongoing priority of mine to offer as many recreation programs as possible for our children,” Stack said. “Giving children the opportunity to participate in recreation gives them a constructive outlet and promotes healthy living.”

For any ideas or suggestions, residents are advised to call the office of Commissioner Lucio Fernandez at 201-348-5746.

Recreational Swimming

The Ron Dario Pool at 219 47th Street is open year-round. Each day the pool is open, residents can enjoy 90 minute sessions.

On Mondays, sessions start at 7 a.m., continuing at 9 a.m., 1 p.m., and 7 p.m. On Wednesdays, sessions start at 7 a.m., continuing at 9 a.m., 1 p.m., 3 p.m., and 5:30 p.m. On Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays, sessions start at 7 a.m., continuing at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m., and 7 p.m. On Saturdays, the sessions start at 9 a.m., continuing at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., and 3 p.m.

For more information, contact Director Elke Voight at 201-867-4496. Registration is not required.

The Water-Babies Swimming Lessons will take place at the pool year round for those ages 3 months old to 5 years old. For those 3 months old to 2 years old, the sessions are held on Saturdays from 9 to 9:45 a.m. For those 3 to 5 years old, sessions are held on Saturdays from 10 to 10:45 a.m.

Registration is not required, but parents must be in the water with the child. For more information, contact Director Elke Voight at 201-867-4496.

Zumba, Aerobics, and Yoga

Zumba and aerobics takes place at the Bruce D. Walter Recreation Center at 507 West Street year round. The program runs Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6 to 9 p.m., and Saturdays from 9 to 11:30 a.m.

The program is also available for those under 18. Zumba classes for those ages 6 and up take place year round on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 6 to 9 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 to 11:30 a.m. For more information, call Director Yareida Peña at 201-667-3101 or email peña8204@gmail.com.

Wellness Yoga at Ellsworth Park at 24th Street and New York Avenue takes place on Mondays and Wednesday at 6 p.m., Thursdays at 7:15 p.m., and Saturdays at 9:15 a.m. For more information, call Director Mary Trigg at 917-226-7830. The classes are free, and registration is not required. 

Wellness Zumba Full Impact will be held in Duarte Park at 32nd Street and New York Avenue on Mondays and Thursdays at 6 p.m. and Sundays at 9 a.m. For more information, call Director Mary Trigg at 917-226-7830. The classes are free, and registration is not required.

Aerobics for seniors takes place on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 1 to 2 p.m. at the William V. Musto Cultural Center at 420 15th Street. The classes are free and registration is not required. 

Wellness Chair Yoga will take place on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1 to 2 p.m. at the William V. Musto Cultural Center at 420 15th Street. For more information, call Director Mary Trigg at 917-226-7830. The classes are free and registration is not required. 

Softball and Baseball

Recreation softball will take place at Washington Park on 2nd Street and Bergenline Avenue for those ages 18 to 20 on Mondays, Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays from 7:30 to 9 p.m. For the summer and fall, registration runs through August 1. Register at Washington Park of Edison School at 507 West Street on Mondays through Saturdays from 6 to 8 p.m. 

There is a version of this program for those under the age of 18. Those ages 8 to 12 will practice on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Sundays from 5 to 7:30 p.m.; those ages 13 to 18 will practice on those same days from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Registration is open through July, Monday through Saturday from 5 to 9 p.m. at Washington Park or Edison School at 507 West Street. 

Recreation baseball will take place at Washington Park on 2nd Street and Bergenline Avenue for those ages 18 to 20 on Mondays through Saturdays through November. There is a version of this program for those under the age of 18. Practice also runs at the same place on Mondays through Saturdays through November.  

Registration is open until July 13, Mondays through Thursdays from 6 to 8 p.m. at Washington Park or at Edison School at 507 West Street. 

For more information on these programs, call directors José Polanco at 201-772-2428 or Vielka Gonzalo at 201-705-2220. A registration fee will apply at the time of registration.

Volleyball for adults and youth

Recreation volleyball will take place year round at Edison School at 507 West Street and Emerson Middle School at 318 18th Street for those ages 18 to 20. Practice takes place on Mondays, Fridays, and Saturdays from 5 to 10 p.m. Registration is open year round from 6 to 8 p.m. at Edison School. A registration fee will apply at the time of registration. There is a version of this program for those under the age of 18.

Children enjoy recreation volleyball as part of the “Cops Care” recreation program in July of 2020.

Union City Recreational Volleyball for those ages 8 to 18 takes place year round at the Edison School at 507 West Street on Mondays through Saturdays from 5 to 10 p.m. 

Registration is open year round from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Birth certificate, proof of address, and a $35 registration fee is required. The registration fee must be paid via a money order to the City of Union City; no credit cards, personal checks, or cash will be accepted. For more information on the programs, call directors José Polanco at 201-772-2428 or Vielka Gonzalo at 201-705-2220.

Youth Basketball and Youth Soccer 

The Union City Basketball League at the Edison School at 507 West Street is open those ages 4 to 18 year round. Those ages 4 to 15 will participate on Wednesdays from 6 to 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 1 to 5 p.m. Those 16 and older will participate on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5 to 9:30 p.m.

Registration is open year round from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Edison School at 507 West Street or Washington Park at 2nd Street and Bergenline Avenue. For more information, call directors José Polanco at 201-772-2428 or Vielka Gonzalo at 201-705-2220. A registration fee will apply at the time of registration.

Union City Travel Soccer runs year round for those ages 8 to 15. Tryouts are at the end of the recreation season; only selected players will join travel teams. For more information, call Directors Jose Renteria at 201-697-2770 or Felix Adames at 201-253-7214. A registration fee will apply at the time of registration.

Union City Top Soccer of children with special needs runs year round. For more information, call coordinator Marcus Lozano at 716-572-2506 or Directors Jose Renteria at 201-697-2770 or Felix Adames at 201-253-7214. There is no registration fee for this program.

Union City Stars FC Soccer Training Program runs year round for those ages 6 to 12 in Washington Park at 2nd Street and New York Avenue. Practice is on Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Register at the William V. Musto Cultural Center at 420 5th Street. For more information, call Director Manuel Corales at 201-923-9817.

Young Marines, Sports Mentoring, and Moroccan Arabic

The Union City Young Marines program is open to those ages 8 to 18 at: Union Hill Middle School at 3808 Hudson Avenue on Mondays and Tuesdays from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.; and Emerson Middle School at 318 13th Street on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.

For more information, call Gunnery Sergeant Reyes at 201-835-2640. There is no registration fee for this program.

The Union City Sports Mentoring Program is open to those ages 7 to 14. For more information, call Director Michelle Stritch at 201-348-5846. There is no registration fee for this program.

The Art in Our World program will run for those ages 6 and up at the Jose Marti STEM Academy at 1800 Summit Avenue for July and August. Classes run Mondays and Wednesdays from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and

Saturdays from 12:30 to 3 p.m. To register or for more information, call Lucy Santiago at 973-460-8781. A registration fee will apply at the time of registration.

A Moroccan Arabic language and Cultural Program runs at the William V. Musto Cultural Center at 420 15th Street for those ages 6 to 17 on Saturdays from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. For more information, call Director Khadijah Introna Mouhou at 201-679-8803.

Taekwondo, Judo, and Martial Arts

Recreation taekwondo will take place at the Bruce D. Walter Recreation Center at 5th Street and West Street for adults year round. Practice is on Wednesdays from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Registration is open on Wednesdays and Saturdays.

Ages 5 and up will practice on Wednesdays from 6 to 9 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, contact Director Ramon Peña at 201-640-7602.

Recreation judo will take place at Roosevelt Elementary School at 4507 Hudson Street for adults year round. Practice is on Thursdays and Fridays from 7:30 to 9 p.m. For those ages 5 to 10, practice is on Mondays and  Thursdays from 6 to 7 p.m. For those ages 8 to 10, practice takes places on Mondays and Thursdays from 6:45 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. And for those ages 11 and up, practice takes place on Wednesdays and Fridays from 6 to 7:45 p.m.

Registration is open year round on Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays from 6 to 9 p.m. For more information, call Director Pedro Savinovich at 201-713-8336 or email unioncityjudoclub2017@gmail.com.

For the MDW School of Martial Arts, taekwondo training will take place at Sara M. Gilmore Academy at 1600 Kerrigan Avenue for adults year round. Practice takes place on Mondays and Wednesdays from 6 to 8 p.m., and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. For those ages 6 and up, practices are on Mondays and Wednesdays from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Registration is open Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. For more information, call Director Victor J. Castillo at 201-838-9121. A registration fee will apply at the time of registration.

Non-stop summer fun

Union City’s Summer Fun program for 2022 runs from July 5 to 29, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. It encompasses the Schoolyard Recreation Summer Program at Roosevelt School, Robert Waters School, Washington School, and Edison School, which is free and includes arts and crafts, sports and fitness, music, educational activities, field trips, and more; the Soaring Eagles Co-Ed Basketball program at the Union City High School gym; the Union City Recreational Soccer Camp at the Midtown Athletic Complex. Registration is open from 4 to 8 p.m. at each respective school.

The first of many block parties was held on 7th Street from Central Avenue to Summit Avenue on July 5. The city will hold another block party from 6 to 9 p.m.: on July 12 on 11th Street from Bergenline Avenue to West Street; on July 19 on 23rd Street from Bergenline Avenue to West Street; on July 26 on 8th Street from Palisade Avenue to New York Avenue; on August 9 on Central Avenue from 23rd to 24th Street; on August 16 on 44th Street from New York Avenue to Palisade Avenue; on August 23 on 39th Street from Hudson Avenue to Park Avenue; and on August 30 on 39th Street from Kennedy Boulevard to Bergen Turnpike.

The first Jazz Night at Ellsworth Park at 23rd Street and Palisade Avenue took place on July 6. The next event is: on July 25 at 7 p.m. at Firefighters Memorial Park at 8th Street and Palisade Avenue; on August 17 at 7 p.m. at Washington Park at 2nd Street and New York Avenue; and August 24 at Celia Cruz Park at 31st Street and Bergenline Avenue.

The Theatre Festival in the Park kicked off on July 7 at 7 p.m. in the War Memorial Plaza at 46th Street and Broadway. The festival continues in the same place at the same time each week on: July 14, July 21, July 28, August 4, August 11, August 18, August 25, September 1, and September 9.

Cultural celebrations abound

The Argentinian Flag Raising Ceremony was held at the International Plaza on July 8. More flag raisings planned at the plaza at 38th Street and Palisade Avenue throughout the summer include: the Colombian Flag raising ceremony on July 20 at 12 p.m.; the Peruvian Flag raising ceremony on July 28 at 12 p.m.; the Ukrainian Flag raising ceremony on August 24 at 12 p.m.; the El Salvador Flag raising ceremony on September 15 at 12 p.m.; and the Honduran Flag raising ceremony on September 16 at 12 p.m. There will also be the Pride Day Flag raising ceremony on August 12 at 12 p.m. at Washington Park and Palisade Avenue.

On July 9, the Liquid Vibes DJ Fest kicked off at the War Memorial Plaza at 46th Street and Broadway from 3 to 8 p.m. The festival returns at the same time and place on August 13.

A mini-concert will be held on July at 6 p.m. in Celia Cruz Park at 31st Street and Bergenline Avenue. The concerts continue on: July 18 at 7 p.m. at the War Memorial Plaza at 46th Street and Broadway; July 25 at 6 p.m. at Celia Cruz Park at 31st Street and Bergenline Avenue; August 1 at 7 p.m. at the War Memorial Plaza at 46th Street and Broadway; August 3 at 7 p.m. at Ellsworth Park at 23rd Street and Palisade Avenue; August 8 at 7p.m. Washington Park at New York Avenue and 2nd Street; on August 15 at 6 p.m. at Celia Cruz Park at 31st Street and Bergenline Avenue; August 22 at 7 p.m. at Ellsworth Park at 23rd Street and Palisade Avenue; and on August 29 at 6 p.m. at the Firefighters Memorial Park at 9th Street and Palisade Avenue.

There will be a number of art exhibitions, starting with the Viva Peru Art Exhibition on July 15 at 7 p.m. at the William V. Musto Cultural Center at 420 15th Street. Other upcoming exhibits include: the Moroccan Art Exhibition on July 30 and 31 from 12 to 8 p.m. and another Art Exhibition on September 16 at 7 p.m., both also at the William V. Musto Cultural Center.

There will be a number of cultural festivals, such as the Peruvian Festival on August 7 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on 15th Street from New York Avenue to Bergenline Avenue. The Pride Day Celebration will take place on August 12 from 6 to 9 p.m. on 15th Street from New York Avenue to Bergenline Avenue. The Teba Comedy Fest will take place on September 8 and 9 at 8 p.m., September 10 at 6 p.m., and September 11 at 4 p.m.

Other opportunities available

The National Night Out Against Crime is set for August 2, from 6 to 10 p.m. on New York Avenue from 23rd Street to 29th Street. The End of the Summer Concert will take place on August 26 from 6 to 9 p.m. on Hudson Avenue from 45th to 46th Street. The Patriot’s Day and 9/11 Ceremony will take place on September 11 at 9 a.m. at Liberty Plaza at 31st Street and Palisade Avenue. Lastly, the 6th International Ballet Festival of Union City will be held on September 24 at 7 p.m. on 46th Street and Broadway.

Ceramics for Seniors will take place from Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the William V. Musto Cultural Center at 420 15th Street. Registration is free from Mondays through Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Proof of age over 55 and proof of Union City residency required.

Meals on Wheels for seniors is available Mondays through Fridays from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the William V. Musto Cultural Center at 420 15th Street. Registration is Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Proof of age and Union City residency required.

Amid all the summer fun opportunities, the city is encouraging residents to get vaccinated at local clinics. Clinics are held at the Union City Housing Authority Pavilion at 3911 Kennedy Boulevard on Thursdays from 3 to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and at Mother Seton School at 1501 New York Avenue on Tuesdays and Fridays from 3 to 7 p.m.

No appointment or insurance is required. For more information, call 201-643-0443. The city encourages residents to get vaccinated to keep the community healthy.

For updates on this and other stories, check www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Daniel Israel can be reached at disrael@hudsonreporter.com.

BAYONNE BRIEFS

Fire in pet shop on Broadway

At 10:17 a.m. on July 23, the Bayonne Fire Department was dispatched to a report of fire at 201 Broadway, in the pet-care business on the first-floor of the mixed-use four-story building. The sprinkler system activated, which helped keep the fire in check until firefighters could extinguish the blaze, which was declared under control at 10:36 a.m. No injuries were reported.

A fire investigation is underway, however, the fire appears to be accidental in nature. All occupants of the residential units were allowed to return home, however, the business will remain closed temporarily until repairs can be made. On the same day, the BFD also responded to a multiple-alarm fire on Washington Street in Hoboken to assist mutual aid partners.

Authorities investigating fatal shooting

The Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office Homicide Unit and the Bayonne Police Department are investigating the fatal shooting of a man in the area of Avenue A and West 21st Street. At approximately 4:27 a.m., the Bayonne Police Department received a report of shots fired in the area of 21st Street and Avenue A.

Upon arrival, responding officers found a male victim inside of a vehicle on West 21st Street west of Avenue A, later identified as 23-year-old Damoi Davauni Campbell of New York. Campbell was pronounced dead at the scene, and the Cause and Manner of Death are pending the findings of the Regional Medical Examiner’s Office.

The Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office Homicide Unit and Bayonne Police Department are actively investigating this case. No arrests have been made at this time.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/27/authorities-investigating-fatal-shooting-in-bayonne.

Generator malfunction at Midtown School

A generator malfunctioned at Midtown Community School on July 27. Bayonne Fire and Police were on scene and deemed the situation safe and under control. There was no hazard to any day campers or staff, according to the Bayonne Office of Emergency Management.

Bike Club to ride again in 2022

At 10 a.m. on August 7, the Bayonne Bike Club will meet again at Stephen Gregg Park near 48th Street at the lower level.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/25/bayonne-bike-club-to-ride-again-come-august.

Library sponsors five contests, offers book recommendations

The Bayonne Public Library, located at 31st Street and Avenue C, is sponsoring five contests from Monday, August 8, to Friday, August 26. The library is also debuting a new book recommendation service called “Your Next Great Read.”

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/26/bayonne-library-sponsors-five-contests-offers-book-recommendations.

Man pleads guilty to shooting Jersey City man in 2020

A Bayonne man has pleaded guilty in relation to a shooting in Jersey City. On July 21, Bernard Wilson, a 29-year-old of Bayonne, pleaded guilty for his role in the 2020 shooting death of Abimael Fuentes, a 38-year-old of Jersey City, on Brinkerhoff Street.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/22/bayonne-man-pleads-guilty-to-shooting-jersey-city-man-in-2020.

Registration open for Design Fashion Camp 

The Bayonne Division of Recreation has announced registration for the inaugural Fashion Design Camp. The program is open to residents only, for children in grades 6 through 8.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/25/bayonne-divison-of-recreation-to-hold-fashion-design-camp.

Summer Sounds By the Bay continues

Long Live the Beatles performed at Summer Sounds By the Bay at the amphitheater at 16th Street Park on July 27. The longest running Beatles show in the country featured impersonations of the band during 1962 to 1970.

Up next is AM Gold Yacht Rock on August 3, a New York City-based tribute band that performs adult-contemporary hit songs from the late ’70s through the mid ’80s referred to as “Yacht Rock” including: Hall & Oates, Steely Dan, Huey Lewis, Christopher Cross, Lionel Richie and more.

The penultimate performance of Summer Sounds by the Bay 2022 includes Lights Out Beach Boys on August 10. The band has been described as a cross of listening to the Beach Boys while watching the smooth moves of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, and will perform all of the west coast hits.

Read the full lineup at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/05/25/summer-sounds-by-the-bay-lineup-announced-for-2022.

Upcoming movies at the library

The Bayonne Free Public Library will present two films on Wednesday, August 10, as part of its ongoing summer movie series. Both films will be shown in the O’Connor Gallery on the library’s second floor at 31st Street and Avenue C.

At 1 p.m., the library will screen Moonfall, a science fiction
disaster film. The story concerns what happens when the Earth’s moon suddenly leaves its orbit. The film stars Halle Berry, Patrick Wilson, Kelly Yu, John Bradley, Charlie Plummer, and Donald Sutherland. Moonfall is rated PG 13 and the running time is 2 hours and 10 minutes.

At 6:30 p.m. on August 10, the library will show The Bad Guys, a computer-
animated heist comedy about a group of anthropromorphic animals. When they are caught in the film, the crooks pretend to attempt to reform themselves. Their leader is drawn to changing his ways when a new villain has his own plans. The Bad Guys features the voices of Sam Rockwell, Marc Maron, Awkwafina, Craig Robinson, Anthony Ramos, Richard Ayoade, Zazie Beetz, Alex Borstein, and Lilly Singh. This film is rated PG and its running time is 1 hour and 40 minutes.

Read the full lineup at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/06/23/bayonne-announces-summer-movies-at-the-library.

Construction for Exchange Place Plaza renovations has begun

Construction for the Exchange Place Plaza renovations in Jersey City had begun last month, amidst controversy over the fate of the Katyn Memorial located there.

Exchange Place Alliance Executive Director Elizabeth Cain told the Hudson Reporter in an email that they broke ground at the location last month, and the fencing erected there will be moved to follow various phases of the project.

“We are currently removing the top paves throughout the site,” she said. “The next step includes the removal of the existing light poles, dead and diseased trees and expanding the fenced area to accommodate more of the total project footprint.”

On August 10, fencing was raised in an area around the western front of Katyn Memorial and one of the entrances to the PATH station. The statue was only accessible from the waterfront towards the east.

An Exchange Place Alliance newsletter dated to August 4 said that they broke ground “shortly after our epic July 4th celebration in the plaza.” According to their website, “Phase 1” of their construction will take place from July to October 31, while “Phase 2” will take place from Nov.1 to Dec. 31.

The Alliance has proposed adding a private roadway, a pedestrian plaza and greenery in the plaza earlier this year as part of their redesign plans.

But the most contentious part includes a semi-circular bench in front of the Katyn Memorial, which has been opposed by a number of residents, including those from the Polish American community, for potentially obstructing the statue.

The statue commemorates the 1940 massacre of more than 22,000 Polish soldiers and prisoners of war by the Soviet Union. It had been planned for relocation four years ago to make way for renovations at the plaza, but ultimately did not go through after months of push back.

The redesigns were initially rejected by the Planning Board back in April, but were then approved by the board after the Alliance appealed. The Alliance is also facing a lawsuit by a local resident and a Polish American group over their approval of the project.

A construction zone can be seen in front of the Katyn Memorial and the PATH station entrance. Photo by Mark Koosau.

“Of course, as part of our commitment to ensure the Katyn Memorial is always accessible and permanently cared for special fencing has been installed,” continued Cain. “We’re thrilled to see ground broken on this project – what is to come will be transformative for the waterfront.”

The Exchange Place Alliance, which is a Special Improvement District, has not seen their new budget adopted by the City Council. The council had given initial approval to it back on July 13, which earmarks $5.5 million for “capital improvements” for the plaza. The council’s next meeting is on August 17.

Councilman James Solomon, who represents the Downtown-based Ward E, said that it is his understanding that the Alliance had acquired permits for construction despite not having their new budget adopted.

“They got approval from City Council to turn the Exchange Place in a pedestrian zone, they got permits from the [Department of Environmental Protection] and others at the city Planning Board,” he said. “In prior year budgets, they’ve been approved for construction, so they can tack those prior year budgets while awaiting the approval on their current fiscal year budget.”

When asked if he supports or opposes the plans that could affect the statue, Solomon replied that there are “reasonable requests to amend the design to create better access to the statue.” “I am hopeful the Alliance will give them due consideration as it moves forward on its project,” he said.

Andrzej Burghardt, the president of the Polish American Congress’ New Jersey division and a vocal critic of the redesign plans, said that the Alliance should not start any construction work while they face a lawsuit. He also questioned whether the Alliance has the permits needed to begin construction.

“About a week from now, the Jersey City Council, we might think that we should again come to this meeting to try to convince the council to demand details, which would answer the questions that I raised,” he said.

For updates on this and other stories, check hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Mark Koosau can be reached at mkoosau@hudsonreporter.com or his Twitter @snivyTsutarja.

Bayonne council introduces 2022 municipal budget

Bayonne has introduced its 2022 calendar year municipal budget. This year, the budget totals $160,467,986, up from $152,961,751 in 2021.

The 2022 municipal budget was introduced by the city council at its July meeting. The public hearing is set for the next meeting of the council in August.

The public hearing and vote on the budget will be held on August 17 at 7 p.m. in the council chambers at City Hall at 630 Avenue C. For more information, go to bayonnenj.org.

The budget by the numbers

Ahead of the public hearing, the Bayonne Community News analyzed the introduced budget. Starting with revenues, the 2022 budget estimates $3,000,000 in anticipated surplus, down from the $7,528,380 surplus in 2021. 

Local revenues are expected to fluctuate but largely remain the same, including from: licenses for alcoholic beverages and other licenses; fees and permits; municipal court fines and costs; interest and costs on taxes, interest on investments and deposits; and rent of city-owned property.

The city also gets a slew of money from payments-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT) agreements, totaling 32. One of those PILOTs went offline this year, but three more are coming online.

Revenue from five year PILOTs is down from $212,945 anticipated in 2021 to $122,237 anticipated in 2022. In 2021, $208,005 was realized in cash.

Overall local revenues, including the PILOTs and other aforementioned sources, is anticipated to remain roughly the same as the $12,982,049 anticipated in 2021 at $12,884,837 anticipated in 2022. In 2021, $13,107,256 was realized in cash.

State aid and shared service agreements

Total state aid is anticipated to be $9,290,398 in 2022, up from the anticipated and realized amount of $8,829,801 in 2021. Of that, most is expected to come from the Energy Receipts Tax, totaling $8,451,132.

Shared services agreements are expected to double from the anticipated $134,000 in 2021 to $383,866 in 2022. However, $315,083 was realized in cash in 2021.

This was due to the higher than anticipated revenue brought in from the shared services agreement with the Bayonne Board of Education for garbage removal. In 2022, the revenue from said garbage removal contract with the Board of Education is anticipated at $325,000.

The other shared services agreements are with West New York for a Health Officer, which is anticipated to bring in $20,000 this year, down from the $30,000 anticipated in 2021. A total of $43,333 that was actually realized in cash that year.

This year, the city also approved a shared services agreement with Jersey City to also provide the services of a Health Officer. Totaling $34,666, the agreement was approved in April and ran until the end of July. The last shared services agreement is between the city and the Bayonne Housing Authority for garbage for $4,200.

Overall revenues anticipated to increase

Public and private revenues, which are mainly grants, are anticipated to increase to $18,466,241. This is up from what was anticipated and realized in cash totaling $13,104,299 in 2021.

Special revenue is expected to increase from the anticipated $14,153,656 in 2021 to the anticipated $20,747,949 in 2022. However, only 12,815,408 was realized in cash in 2021.

Total miscellaneous revenues are anticipated to be at $61,685,158, up from 49,203,807 in 2021. That was close to what was actually realized in cash in 2021, at $48,171,849.

The total amount to be raised by taxes for support of the municipal budget is anticipated to be $95,682,828, up from the anticipated $95,772,573 in 2021. However, $96,611,139 was realized in cash in 2021.

Altogether, the total general revenues are anticipated to to be $160,467,986, up from $152,611,751 anticipated in 2021. What was realized in cash that year was actually $153,057,652.

Appropriations increase, too

For 2022, total appropriations are anticipated to be $160,467,986, up from the $152,611,751 appropriated in 2021. What was actually expended last year was $149,483,155, with $3,478,593 reserved.

In this budget, general appropriations for municipal purposes is anticipated to be $113,775,204 in 2022, up from the $110,256,812 appropriated in 2021. What was paid or charged in 2021 was actually $107,255,154, with $3,001,657 reserved.

Included in that are municipal operations, anticipated to be $96,002,600 in 2022, up from the $91,519,156 appropriated in 2021. What was expended in 2021 was $88,733,552, with $2,785,603 reserved.

Of the $96,002,600, most is anticipated to go towards salaries and wages totaling $62,545,000, with the rest going toward other expenses totaling $33,457,600, This is up from the $58,329,680 appropriated for salaries and wages and the $33,189,476 appropriated for other expenses in 2021.

Salaries and wages, and statutory expenditures

Of the appropriations reserved for salaries and wages in 2021, $59,296,373 was paid or charged and $893,396 was reserved. For other expenses in 2021, $29,437,178 was paid or charged and $1,892,297 was reserved.

Of note, the only major change to the otherwise small fluctuations in salaries and wages was a nearly $3 million boost to the salaries and wages of the uniformed police officers from $20,115,000 appropriated in 2021 to $23,200,000 anticipated in 2022. Additionally, office expenses of the Health Division is expected to decrease from the $1,880,000 appropriated in 2021 to $340,000 anticipated in 2022.

Statutory expenditures are expected to total $17,772,604 in appropriations for 2022, down from $18,737,655 anticipated in 2021. $18,521,601 was paid or charged in 2021 and $216,053 was reserved.

These expenditures include things like public employees’ retirement system, social security system, consolidated police and fireman’s retirement system of New Jersey, Unemployment Compensation Insurance, pensioners and widowers. The anticipated decrease is largely due to a drop in the Police and Fireman Retirement System of NJ, which is expected to decrease from $13,989,775 in 2021 appropriations to an anticipated $12,694,900 in 2022.

Other appropriations for municipal purposes

Other appropriations for municipal purposes are anticipated to be $21,867,658. This is up from $16,051,683 appropriated in 2021. What was paid or charged was actually $15,992,254, with $409,29 reserved.

Other operations are expected to total $2,754,495 including the maintenance of the Bayonne Free Public Library. This is roughly the same as what was appropriated for the library in 2021 at $2,639,689. What was paid or charged in 2021 was $2,298,438, with $341,250 in reserve.

Then there is $383,866 anticipated to be appropriated for the shared service agreements that the city is reimbursed for, as mentioned previously. There is also $18,729,296 to be appropriated for public and private programs offset by revenues, which account for the grants the city has received to fund several projects.

Capital improvements are anticipated to total $300,000 in appropriations, for the Capital Improvement Fund. This is down from $850,000 appropriated last year, which is because the city paid for a new generator for City Hall in 2021 totaling $700,000. What was actually paid or charged for the generator was $632,493 with $67,507 reserved.

Debt service, deferred charges, and uncollected taxes

Additionally in the appropriations, the Municipal Debt Service is anticipated to total $13,432,058 in 2022. This is roughly the same as the $13,704,101 appropriated in 2021. This includes things like: the payment of bond principal, anticipation notes, and capital notes; interest on bonds, and interest on notes among other things.

Deferred charges are anticipated to be $490,251 in appropriations. This is up from $193,008 appropriated in 2021, due to the Declared State of Emergency Costs from Tropical Storm Ida.

For local school district purposes, $9,027,410 in appropriations are anticipated. This is a decrease from what was appropriated for 2021 at $10,453,613. Both payments of bond principals and interest on bonds decreased.

The reserve for uncollected taxes is expected to total $1,575,404 in appropriations. The is up from $1,102,533 in 2021.

Parking Utility Budget and Capital Improvement Fund

The Dedicated Parking Utility Budget totals $1,816,159. This is up from the anticipated $1,703,957 appropriated in 2021. What was expended was $1,603,114, with $100,842 in reserve.

There also is $1,853,750.00 in the Capital Improvement Fund, for various improvements including to the Public Library, Fitzpatrick Park, 16th Street Park, and various bridge, roadway, and traffic improvements in addition to various capital improvements.

Read the introduced budget at: bayonnenj.org/_Content/pdf/budgets/2022-Introduced-Budget.pdf.

For updates on this and other stories, check www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Daniel Israel can be reached at disrael@hudsonreporter.com.

North Bergen police and DPW rescue trapped raccoon

The North Bergen authorities helped free a trapped raccoon on July 26 amid a storm.

“During the heavy rain yesterday, Officers B. Bowen & Antelo observed a trapped raccoon in a sewer by 76th & Bergenline Avenue,” the North Bergen Police Department said in a statement.

North Bergen Department of Public Works responded to the scene near the corner of 76th Street and Bergenline Avenue. On scene, and with team work with North Bergen police officers, they were able to safely rescue the trapped raccoon.

For updates on this and other stories, check www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Daniel Israel can be reached at disrael@hudsonreporter.com.

HUDSON REPORTER BRIEFS

First building in Jersey City Bayfront project approved

The first part of Jersey City’s ambitious Bayfront project was approved by the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency, which will pave the way for the creation of a six story building alongside the Hackensack River Waterfront.

The new building, titled the Bayfront Promenade, will include 209 units, with 35 percent of it set aside for affordable housing. It will also include retail space, green infrastructure, flood mitigation and other amenities.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/21/first-building-in-jersey-city-bayfront-project-approved.

Secaucus Town Council and Board of Education to hold joint meeting

Mayor Michael Gonnelli and the Secaucus Town Council are again set to hold a special joint meeting with the Secaucus Board of Education, slated for 4:30 p.m. on August 8 in the council chambers on the first floor in the Municipal Center at 1203 Paterson Plank Road.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/25/secaucus-town-council-and-board-of-education-to-hold-joint-meeting.

Weehawken Recreation offers Tennis Camp

Weehawken Recreation’s Tennis Camp is set to offer its third session through mid-August. The program is $40 per session, and runs on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/21/weehawken-recreation-offers-tennis-camp-at-the-waterfront-complex.

2022 Hoboken Spaghetti Block Party set for August

The 2022 edition of Hoboken’s Spaghetti Dinner Block Party will be taking place on Aug. 30 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Sinatra Drive walkway between 1st and 2nd Streets. Dinner will includes four types of pasta, salad and other dishes, along with drinks available for an additional charge.

Tickets are limited and must be purchased in advance. Adult tickets are $40 each, children tickets for those 12 and under will cost $15, senior tickets for those 65 or older will cost $20, and a table for 10 is $400

Tickets can be purchased online at www.hobokennj.gov/register or via mail with a check or money order. For more info, visit www.hobokennj.gov/events/spaghetti-dinner-block-party-2022.

North Bergen authorities free trapped raccoon

During the heavy rain on July 26, North Bergen police observed a trapped raccoon in a sewer by 76th Street and Bergenline Avenue. North Bergen Department of Public Works responded to the scene, and with team work with police officers, they were able to safely rescue the trapped raccoon.

See pictures of the raccoon at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/27/north-bergen-police-and-dpw-rescue-trapped-raccoon.

Weehawken warns to water trees and shrubs

Due to the lack of significant rain and high temperatures, many trees in Weehawken are in distress, according to the Weehawken Tree Committee. Throughout the recent record heat wave prompted by the climate crisis, Weehawken is warning locals to water nearby greenery.

Read the full story at: hudsonreporter.com/2022/07/27/weehawken-warns-to-water-trees-and-shrubs-amid-heat-wave.

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